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The executive department that deals most with foreign countries is the Department of Defense.
the Department of State.
the Department of Labor.
the Department of Commerce.

source : weegy.com

The executive department that deals most with foreign countries is the Department of Defense.
the Department of State.
the Department of Labor.
the Department of Commerce.

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U.S. Foreign Policy Powers: Congress and the President

U.S. Foreign Policy Powers: Congress and the President – The president's authority in foreign affairs, as in all areas, is rooted in Article II of the Constitution. The charter grants the officeholder the powers to make treaties and appoint ambassadors…The Executive Branch conducts diplomacy with other nations, and the President has the power to negotiate and sign treaties, which also must be ratified by two-thirds of the Senate. The President can issue executive orders, which direct executive officers or clarify and further existing laws.The Executive Branch and Congress were given the constitutional responsibilities to aid in U.S. foreign policy. The lead U.S. foreign affairs agency is the Department of State, which is within the Executive Branch. The President's principal foreign policy adviser is the current Secretary of State.

The Executive Branch | whitehouse.gov – The Executive Departments The day-to-day enforcement and administration of federal laws is in the hands of the various executive departments, created by Congress to deal with specific areas of national and international affairs. The heads of the departments, chosen by the president and approved by the Senate, form a council of advisersForeign Policy: War, Peace, and Everything In-between Learning Objectives. Students will be able to: Define the terms "foreign" and "domestic." Distinguish between foreign and domestic policy. Identify the three main tools the executive branch uses for foreign policy. Determine how the executive and legislative branches shareQuestion: The executive department that deals most with foreign countries is A. the Department of Defense. B. the Department of State. C. the Department of Labor. D. the Department of Commerce.

The Executive Branch | whitehouse.gov

Which Cabinet Department Deals With Issues of Foreign – The Department of State advises the President on foreign-policy issues, works to carry out the country's foreign policy, maintains relations between foreign countries and the United States, negotiates treaties and agreements with foreign nations, speaks for the United States in the United Nations and other major international organizations, and supervises embassies, missions, and consulates overseas.The United States Department of State (DoS), often referred to as the State Department, is the U.S. federal executive department responsible for the international relations of the United States, equivalent to the foreign ministries of other countries. The Department was created in 1789 and was the first executive department established.The executive department that deals most with foreign countries is the Department of Defense. the Department of State. the Department of Labor. the Department of Commerce.

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Articles Three and Four of the Executive Branch – Today we'll learn about Articles 3 and 4 of the Constitution.
Article 3 goes over the Judicial Branch, or in other words, the Federal Court System. Article 4 goes over the relations between States. The Judicial Branch's job is to interpret laws, or in other words, determine if a law has been broken. The only court named in the Constitution is the Supreme Court. So, in other words when the country was founded it was the only court. However, Article 3 states the judicial power of the United States shall be vested in one Supreme Court and in such inferior courts as the Congress may from time-to-time ordain and establish. This means that Congress has the power to create other Federal Courts below the Supreme Court, and they have done so. Today there are many federal courts spread out across the country. Article 3 also discusses the jurisdiction of the federal courts. Jurisdiction means the right to hear a case. The Federal Courts can hear any cases that involve the Constitution, federal laws, Ambassadors, disputes between two or more states, and disputes with foreign countries. If a case does not fall under one of these categories, then the Federal Courts do not have jurisdiction. That usually means the case must be heard in a state court instead. The Supreme Court usually only hears cases that have already been tried in the lower federal courts and are being appealed. An appellate or appeals case is a case where a lower court has already tried a case but a person involved in the case disagrees with the verdict and wants it reversed or changed. Most of the cases that come before the Supreme Court are considered appellate cases. However, there are two types of cases that are viewed as so important that they are heard directly by the Supreme Court without going to a lower court first. These cases include ones involving Ambassadors, and cases in which a state is a party. Therefore, the Supreme Court has two types of jurisdiction: Appellate Jurisdiction, when they hear a case on an appeal from a lower court, and Original Jurisdiction, when they have the right to hear a case for the first time; but remember, only ones involving Ambassadors and states. Now we will move on to Article 4. Article 4 goes over the relations between States or in other words how States are expected to interact with one another. Section 1 of Article 4 is known as "The Full Faith and Credit Clause." It says that all States must respect the laws, public records, and court decisions of the other States. Section 2 is known as the Privileges and Immunities Clause. It says that each State must give residents of other States the same rights and privileges it gives its own residents. Section 2 also deals with extradition. This means if you commit a crime in one state and flee to another state that state should send you back. Or, in other words, extradite you to the state where you committed the crime. You will then stand trial in the state where you committed the crime originally. Section 2 also states that no new state may be created or admitted to the Union without the permission of Congress. Lastly, all states must have a Republican form of government; in other words, a democracy. Under these terms all states are guaranteed protection if they ask the federal government for help. Let's review. Article 3 outlines the Judicial Branch. This includes the Supreme Court, the lower courts, and their jurisdictions. Article 4 outlines the relations between states including the Full Faith and Credit Clause, the Privileges and Immunities Clause, extradition, procedures for the admission of new States, the requirement that all States must be democracies, and the idea that all States are entitled to the protection of the federal government if they ask for it. .

Ang Papel ng Pangulo – The Republic of the Philippines is made up of three branches – the Executive, the Legislative, and the Judiciary.
The President serves as both the Head of State and of Government. Hello! This is Ricardo and welcome to another episode of… In this episode, I shall embark on topics pertaining to the Philippine government, its political structure, and the various processes that it undertakes to effectively run the country. Let’s start off with these… The Philippines is a democratic republic system of government with the president acting as the sovereign head of all government instrumentalities whereby s/he serves as both Head of State and of Government. The Head of State refers to a person who formally represents the people of the nation on the world stage. The Head of Government, on the other hand, is the person who is the leader or “in charge” of creating and executing laws. In the Philippines, it is performed by a single person – the President. But, did you know that the position of the president was not always the case as mentioned above? During the incumbency of President Aguinaldo, he just served as the head of state, while Apolinario Mabini served as the Prime Minister or head of government. Later on, Mabini was succeeded by Pedro Paterno. Moreover, when Ferdinand Marcos was the president, a new Philippine Constitution came into effect in 1978, which created the position of a prime minister. For a time, President Marcos served as prime minister until he appointed Cesar Virata, who was then serving as Minister of Finance, to replace him. However, after the 1986 People Power Revolution resulted in victory, extensive reforms in our Constitution ensued, which included the abandonment of the position of a prime minister. Both powers as head of state and of government reverted back to the president. Pursuant to the 1986 Philippine Constitution, the Executive Branch of government is headed by the president who is elected to serve a fixed-term of six years in office without the possibility of re-election. As mentioned in the previous episodes, it is done through a competitive election where a candidate who garners the highest number of votes is declared as the president-elect-regardless of whether or not s/he gets the majority vote. However, due to the multi-party system in the Philippines, the winning candidate, oftentimes, would not get the majority vote. This is what we refer to as the plurality electoral system. The following are the president's duties as head of the Executive Branch of government. The president is the appointing authority for the members of the cabinet, who shall take charge of the different agencies of the government. To be handed over to these appointees are the portfolios of the various government instrumentalities like the Department of Health (DOH), Department of Public Works and Highways (DPWH), Department of Foreign Affairs (DFA), and many others. The president has the sole prerogative to name or dismiss any of the appointive officials serving at his pleasure. Some of the current members of the cabinet of President Duterte are Teodoro Locsin, Jr. of the DFA, and Leonor Magtolis-Briones of the Department of Education (DepEd). All these agencies under the direct supervision of the president assist in the implementation of the laws and policies enacted by the Legislative Branch of government. The president also serves as the Commander-in-Chief of the Armed Forces of the Philippines (AFP). It is his primary duty to ensure a very high level of supervision over the responsible conduct as a good officer and a gentleman on the part of our security forces, as well as to look after the general welfare of the entire armed forces. The decision on the role of the military personnel on the local as well as on international stage, likewise, lies in the hands of a Philippine president. In the 1950s, for instance, President Ramon Magsaysay spearheaded the campaign to put an end to the rebellion perpetrated by the Hukbalahap. During the incumbency of President Noynoy Aquino, the responsibility for the military disaster in Mindanao that claimed the lives of the famous SAF 44 lies in his hands. In the current administration, it is President Duterte who makes crucial decisions on the issue of the West Philippine Sea. Above all, it is incumbent upon the president to project a good public image of our nation in the international arena. Surely, any statements made in public by a president shall impact on our relations with other countries. Which is why, it is imperative for the president to take extra precaution in making public statements on various issues surrounding the office of the presidency. It is his primary duty to take care of our national interests, and part and parcel of these is to establish good foreign relations. We shall now proceed to the Legislative Branch in the next episode. I am Ricardo Padilla and this is "IBANG KLASENG KLASE!" And if you loved this video, why don't you subscribe, and hit the bell so you can see our latest videos. See you next time! And if you have any opinions, clarifications or suggestions, kindly send me a message via the comment section and I will try my level best to respond to them. .

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