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What causes a metal ion with a net +3 charge and five electrons in the 3d subshell to bring about Fe?

source : yahoo.com

What causes a metal ion with a net +3 charge and five electrons in the 3d subshell to bring about Fe?

Going through questions and answers on a test, one of the questions asked to do the following:

“A metal ion with a net +3 charge has five electrons in the 3d subshell. Identify the metal.”

The answer is Fe, but I am unsure as to why. Could someone give me an explanation?

3.31 Determine the indices for the directions shown in the following

3.31 Determine the indices for the directions shown in the following – …have a net negative charge while the Si side of the bond would have a net positive charge. (b) In 8. For a ceramic compound, what are the two characteristics of the component ions that determine the 9. Iron oxide (FeO) has the rock salt crystal structure and a density of 5.70g/cm3. (a) Determine…Q12 Electrons are emitted with zero velocity from a metal surface when it is exposed to radiation of wavelength 6800 Q13 What is the wavelength of Q33 What transition in the hydrogen spectrum would have the same wavelength as the Balmer transition n = 4 to n = 2 o… Q34 Calculate the energy…Identify the metal." The answer is Fe, but I am unsure as to why. Could someone give me an explanation? If the element has lost three e⁻s and still has five left then it had eight e⁻s in the neutral state. It turns out that the group number of a TM (groups 4-11) is also the number of valence…

CBSE Free NCERT Solution of 11th chemistry Structure of… | SaralStudy – Textbook solution for Introductory Chemistry: A Foundation 9th Edition Steven S. Zumdahl Chapter 4 Problem 102AP. We have step-by-step solutions for your textbooks written by Bartleby experts! Identify the metal ion and determine its mass number.Identify the metal. 24.An electron in a hydrogen atom is excited from the ground state to the n= 4 state. Whichof the following statements is(are) false?These three electrons have unpaired spins. The alkali metal sodium (atomic number 11) has one more electron than the neon atom. Both atoms, which are in the alkali metal family, have only one electron in a valence s subshell outside a filled set of inner shells.

CBSE Free NCERT Solution of 11th chemistry Structure of... | SaralStudy

What causes a metal ion with a net +3 charge and five electrons in… – Identify the metal. A metal tends to loss electrons, it forms metal ions. Charge on a metal cation indicates that number of electrons lost by the metal atom.Identify the metal. When the metal is present in a transition series (here it is present in first transition series), the removal of valence electron takes place from '4s' shell first and then from '3d' shell.Transition metal atoms may have a charge from +1 to +7; the charge depends on the element and other atoms in the molecule. The electric charge on a transition metal ion is all about the number of electrons it has lost to other atoms in a chemical reaction.

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