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Which of the following sentences has a compound predicate? A. She raced along the path to

source : jiskha.com

Which of the following sentences has a compound predicate? A. She raced along the path to

Questions

Which of the following sentences has a compound predicate?A. She raced along the path to beat him to the beach.B. While he swam, she collected shells.C. She washed the shells and dried them in the sun.D. She placed the shells in a plastic bag while he dried himself off.

Which of the following sentences has a dangling modifier?A. When the storm began to abate, we went home.B. By the light of the moon, I tripped over a rock. <(My answer)<C. The dog that is man’s best friend is cat’s worst enemy.D. On the way to the bank, the interest rates went down.

A clause from sentence (i) has been turned into a(n) _____ in sentence (ii)(i)Since she knew what the lecture was about, she didn’t attend the meeting.(ii)Knowing what the lecture was about, she didn’t attend the meeting.A. compound predicateB. relative pronounC. infinitiveD. phrase

Thanks in advance!

Which of the following sentences has a compound predicate?A. She raced along the path to beat him to the beach.B. While he swam, she collected shells.C. She washed the shells and dried them in the sun.D. She placed the shells in a plastic bag while he dried himself off.A compound predicate has two or more verbs joined by “and, or, but.” Which one of the above sentences fits that description?

Which of the following sentences has a dangling modifier?A. When the storm began to abate, we went home.B. By the light of the moon, I tripped over a rock. <(My answer)<C. The dog that is man’s best friend is cat’s worst enemy.D. On the way to the bank, the interest rates went down.The sentence you chose is awkwardly worded, but the modifing subordinate clause describes the verb, “tripped.” However, the last sentence implies that the interest rates were going to the bank. The sentence should be “While I was on the way to the bank . . .”

A clause from sentence (i) has been turned into a(n) _____ in sentence (ii)(i)Since she knew what the lecture was about, she didn’t attend the meeting.(ii)Knowing what the lecture was about, she didn’t attend the meeting.A. compound predicateB. relative pronounC. infinitiveD. phraseLook at the introductory words in each sentence. In sentence i, the introductory words have a subject and verb. In sentence ii, the introductory words don’t contain a subject and verb. What is a group of words without a subject and verb?

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Travis

Jul 6, 2006

The types of the Predicate

The types of the Predicate – There are the following types of the predicate: Predicate. Simple I've been waiting for you for two hours. Compound. Nominal She is an actress. Verbal. Modal You should have told me about it yesterday. He is sure to be waiting for us. (of special type). Aspect She began to cry.1. A compound sentence is a sentence which consists of two or more clauses coordinated with each other. (A) Subject clauses perform the function of subject to the predicate of the principal clause. It may also be pointed out that a sentence with a restrictive clause contains a single statement, and…A compound predicate is "two or more verbs or verb phrases that share the same subject and are joined by a conjunction." Option A has one subject -she- performing two actions: washing and drying the shells. Options B and C have two subjets: he and she; and option D has only one action followed by…

Lecture 14: THE COMPOUND SENTENCE — Студопедия.Нет – SUBJECT & PREDICATE In a simple sentence there is one subject and one predicate. · HOW TO FIND THE OBJECT : put one of the following questions to the subject and its verb. A compound predicate occurs when the subject in the sentence is doing more than one action and is shared by…First, we should know what a compound predicate is. A compound predicate is when a subject has 2 or more verbs. In your sentence, you have two verbs, which are washed and dried.Compound predicates are also known as compound verbs that are usually joined by a conjunction such as and or or. In other words, a compound verb is Interrogative sentences—sentences that ask questions—will generally begin with a verb, a helping verb, or either of the following words: what…

Lecture 14: THE COMPOUND SENTENCE — Студопедия.Нет

Which of the following sentences contains a compound predicate? – compound predicate – a predicate that includes more than one verb pertaining to the same subject. A compound predicate is when a single subject is in both sentences.Compound predicate definition: A compound predicate consists of two or more verbs or verb phrases that are joined by a conjunction. A compound predicate is different from a compound sentence. A compound sentence contains more than one independent clause (more than one…§ 53. The compound verbal predicate of double orientation consists of two parts. The first part is a finite verb which denotes the attitude to, evaluation of, or comment on, the content of the sentence expressed by the speaker or somebody not mentioned in the sentence. The second part denotes the…

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Recognizing Subordinate Clauses – .

SUBJECT-VERB AGREEMENT SERIES — Episode 005: Intervening Expressions – Hello there, and welcome back to "The English
Quarters"! This is Sir Dee and I welcome you to the fifth
episode of our SUBJECT-VERB AGREEMENT series! Before we move on, as always, here are some
reminders: If you find this video interesting or if you
love our content in general, please leave a like, subscribe, and hit that notification
bell.
We're doing our best to make more content,
so stay tuned! Follow us on social media, too! For Facebook, that's @theenglishquarters and
for Twitter, that's @EnglishQuarters. If you missed the last episode or if you want
to check out the source document for this series, we got you covered! Those are linked in the description box below. And yes, some final reminders:
Please take the lessons at your own pace! Feel free to pause the video when you feel
the need to! Remember that subjects will appear in blue
and verbs will appear in yellow! And last, but not least, please enjoy learning! Well, with things out of the way, let's start. This episode will discuss the rule about predicate
nominatives. That's Rule #5 on our source document. And I quote:
"The verb agrees with its subject, not with the predicate nominative." "Uhh, Sir Dee, what is a predicate nominative?" "Oh! Let me explain." A predicate nominative is a word (or a group
of words) that renames, classifies, and/or provides more information about the subject. It is usually placed after a linking verb. Also, take note that the predicate nominative
is always a noun, a pronoun, or a noun phrase. On the other hand, a predicate adjective is
not a noun or a pronoun. Obviously, it's an adjective. Check the examples on the screen to see the
difference. John is a student. John is smart. While both "a student" and "smart" tell more
about the subject, "student" is a noun and "smart" is an adjective. Okay, with the difference between predicate
nominatives and predicate adjectives established, let's look at some sentences that contain
predicate nominatives. Sentence #1
"I am the head butler." "Butler" is the predicate nominative here. It tells us more information about the "I"
in the sentence and it is placed after the linking verb which is "am". P.S. "Am" is a common linking verb. Some of the other common ones are be, is,
are, was, and were. Take note that there are a lot of linking
verbs, though! A link containing linking verbs can be found
in the video description below. Going back, Rule #5 says that the verb agrees
with the subject, not the predicate nominative. So the verb agrees with "I", not "the head
butler". Well, both "I" and "butler" are singular nouns,
so you'll get scot-free on this one if you mistakenly caused your verb to agree with
the word "butler". The next sentence shows us why we need to
be careful, though! Sentence #2
His main concern is the connecting flights that he has to take to reach Tuvalu. By the way, Tuvalu is the least visited country
in the world. It's a great place, though! I happened to watch Yes Theory's video about
it the other day, and oh boy, you guys should watch it! I linked it in the description box below. Going back, "flights" is the predicate nominative
in this sentence. It is placed after the linking verb "is". Interestingly, "concern" (the subject of the
sentence) and "flights" (the predicate nominative) differ in number – "concern" is singular while
"flights" is plural. Because the verb agrees with the subject,
the verb is singular, not plural. Let's look at one more sentence. Sentence #3:
Rhea and Gia are friends. In this example, "friends" is the predicate
nominative. It "renames" the words "Rhea" and "Gia" and
it is placed after the linking verb "are". Because Rhea and Gia are two persons that
comprise a compound noun, we need to use a plural verb. All right, that's that! Pretty easy, right? Episode Takeaway Time! And yes, feel free to check the examples on
the screen for details. To see if Rule #5 applies, see if the sentence
has a linking verb and if that linking verb is followed by a noun, pronoun, or a noun
phrase. Predicative nominatives are nouns, pronouns,
or noun phrases. Predicate adjectives are adjectives, of course. And take note that the verb agrees with the subject,
not with the predicate nominative. Okay, we're done! But like last time, let's do some quick exercises
to reinforce our learning. You may pause the video to give yourself more
thinking time. Answers will be given after 5 seconds. Best of luck! Congratulations! And thank you for finishing Episode 005 of
this series. So, what do you think? Was this episode helpful or interesting in
any way? Would you like to share more about the topic
discussed in this episode? Tell me more in the comments section below. If you think this episode will be helpful
to someone who wants to learn more about the English language, please feel free to share
this video and spread the word about our channel. Once again, please leave a like, subscribe,
and hit that notification bell, especially if you find this video interesting or if you
just love what we do! More videos to come soon! Follow us on social media, too! For Facebook, that's @theenglishquarters and
for Twitter, that's @EnglishQuarters. Again, this is Sir Dee. Padayon, English learners! God bless you! .

Simple Sentence with Compound Subjects and Verbs – .